Saturday, October 20, 2018
East Harlem/El Barrio Community Land Trust
East Harlem/El Barrio Community Land Trust

Seeking Volunteers!

Are you interested in helping promote truly affordable housing?  Will you help us organize tenants in distressed buildings to join our project?

Read more…

Get Involved

There are approximately 47 HDFCs (low-income cooperatives) in East Harlem, many of which need access to capital, repairs and technical support, and are vulnerable to being sold to private investors.

If the East Harlem/El Barrio Community Land Trust were to be expanded, it could:

  • Create a stable source of housing for segments of the population currently excluded from the housing market
  • Prevent displacement of residents currently at risk and thus stabilize the neighborhood.
  • Provide a shared focus for organizing and a framework for collaboration at neighborhood and city levels.
  • Lay the groundwork for a Citywide Land Trust that serves as a “central server” (with local land trust governance); creates subsidiaries to pool some resources; and provides a path to permanent affordability and community planning across the city.

How Can a CLT Help Me?

  • In joining the MHA, HDFC residents give up ownership but gain the ability to finance repairs and rehabilitation.
  • All residents gain support from the MHA-CLT and protection from rapidly rising rents and speculators through the CLT ground lease.
  • All residents gain a say in the building management through the MHA and broader community planning through the CLT.
  • The city gives up potential income from the larger number of higher paying tenants that might have moved in if the buildings had gone to investors.
  • The city gains the ability to preserve past subsidies and a long term, responsible steward of subsidies going forward.

Want to be a part of building the East Harlem/El Barrio Community Land Trust? Become a contributor, organize your building, and get involved! For more information, please contact: info@ehebclt.nyc.

Source: Information and graphics courtesy of the New York City Community Land Initiative (NYCCLI).